Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Today we’re going
to kick it old school, and create one of the most iconic handheld consoles of
all time: the original Game Boy.

This is probably
going to be one of my favorite tutorials yet, since not only do I get to
recreate this awesome device, but I also get the chance to share the process
with you and show you how easy it is to build it. We’ll be using basic
shapes such as rectangles, rounded rectangles and circles to gradually create
our little illustration.

So, grab a cup of your favorite roasted coffee beans, and let’s get
started!

Oh, I almost forgot, if you want to expand your illustration to a larger set,
you can find tons of great illustrations over at Envato Market.

1. Set Up a New
Document

As with any new
project, the first thing that we’re going to do is make sure that we’ve set up
a proper new document.

To do this, go to File > New or use the Control-N keyboard shortcut, and adjust
its settings as follows:

  • Number of Artboards: 1
  • Width: 800
    px
  • Height: 600
    px
  • Units: Pixels

And from the Advanced tab:

  • Color Mode: RGB
  • Raster Effects: Screen
    (72 ppi)
  • Align New Objects to
    Pixel Grid:
    checked

setting up a new document

2. Set Up a Custom
Grid

Since Illustrator
lets us take advantage of its powerful Grid
system, we will want to set it up using the lowest possible values, so that
we can take full control over our shapes by making sure they are perfectly
snapped to the underlying Pixel Grid.

The settings that
we’re interested in can be found under the Edit
> Preferences > Guides & Grid
submenu, and should be adjusted as
follows:

  • Gridline every: 1
    px
  • Subdivisions: 1

You can learn more about grids by reading this in-depth article on how Illustrator’s Grid System works.

Once we’ve set up our custom grid, all we need to do in order to make sure our shapes look crisp is enable the Snap to Grid option, found under the View menu, which will change into Snap to Pixel each time you enter Pixel Preview mode.

Since we’re aiming for a pixel-perfect workflow, I strongly recommend you go through my how to create pixel-perfect artwork tutorial, which will help you widen your technical skills in no time.

setting up a custom grid

3. Set Up Some
Layers

With our project file
created, it would be a good idea to layer our illustration, since we’re going
to be using a colored background which could get in our way.

So, assuming you
know how to use the Layers panel,
bring it up, and create two layers which we will rename using brief
descriptions to make them easier to identify:

  • layer 1 >
    background
  • layer 2 > game boy

Normally we could have separated our illustration into different sections, each with its own layer, but I thought it would be a good idea to get familiar with Illustrator‘s Isolation Mode, since you’ll find it really useful when it comes to managing grouped objects.

setting up the layers

4. Create the
Background

Now that we’ve
made a couple of adjustments to our project file and Illustrator itself, we can
start working on our little Game Boy.

The first thing
that we’re going to do is add a colored background, which will make the device
stand out.

Step 1

Make sure you’re on the right layer, and then using the Rectangle Tool (M) create an 800 x 600 px shape, which we will color
using #F96969 and then position in the center of the Artboard by using the Align panel’s
Horizontal and Vertical Align Center options.

aligning the background to the center of the artboard

Step 2

Once you’re done, lock the current layer, and move on up to the next one
where we’re going to start working on the actual handheld console.

using the layers panel to lock the background

5. Create the Front
Section of the Game Boy

With the
background in place, we can now focus on our little console, which we will
create using some of Illustrator’s
basic shapes.

We’ll start by focusing on the front section of the device, and once we’re done will move to the side section.

Step 1

Start working on the device’s main body, by creating a 144 x 232 px rounded rectangle with an 8 px Corner Radius, which we will color
using #EDE4E4 and position towards the center of our Artboard.

creating the main shape for the devices front section

Step 2

Using the Direct Selection Tool
(A)
, select the shape’s lower right corner and adjust its roundness by
setting its radius to 32 px from within the Transform panel’s Rectangle Properties.

adjusting the game boys front section

Step 3

Create the side section of the console so that we can properly align the
device to the Artboard, by grabbing
a copy (Control-C > Control-B) of
the shape that we have, and moving it towards the left side by 24 px, making sure to change its color
to something a little darker (#DDCCCC).

creating the side section of the console

Step 4

Create another copy (Control-C) of the console’s main shape and paste
it in place (Control-F), and then
apply a -4 px offset to it, by going
over to Object > Path > Offset
Path
and entering the value into the Offset
field.

using the offset path tool to create the main highlight for the devices front section

Quick tip: if you’ve never used the Offset Path tool to create outlines, I recommend you check out this
tutorial that compares the two main methods for creating line icons, which shows you the exact process that can be applied to anything else, not just icons.

Step 5

We will use this offset to create an outer highlight, by selecting both
it and the copy, and then using Pathfinder’s
Minus Front Shape Mode to create the
cutout. Then, select the resulting shape and change its color to white
(#FFFFFF), setting its Blending Mode to
Lighten and making sure to lower its Opacity to 40%.

adjusting the outer highlight for the devices front section

Step 6

At this point it would be a good idea to start separating the front of the device from its side section, by selecting and grouping its composing elements using the Control-G keyboard shortcut.

This way, you can add new details to it by simply double clicking on the grouped objects to enter Isolation Mode.

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create
a 144 x 4 px horizontal divider line
(#D8C5C5) which we will position towards the top section of the console,
leaving a 16 px gap.

adding the top horizontal divider to the devices front section

Step 7

Give the horizontal divider some depth by adding another darker 144 x 2 px rectangle (#C1A8A8) just
above it, which will act as a shadow.

Once you’ve added the second horizontal divider line, select both it and the thicker one and group them together using the Control-G keyboard shortcut.

adding a shadow to the horizontal divider from the front section of the device

Step 8

Next, we will add two 6 x 16 px rectangles
(#D8C5C5) over the two horizontal divider lines that we created a few moments ago, positioning each one at a distance of 12
px
from the front body’s sides.

adding the two vertical divider lines to the devices front section

Step 9

Give the two vertical dividers that we’ve just created some depth, by
adding two 6 x 2 px rectangles (#C1A8A8)
which we will position towards their top side, and then group them (Control-G) into two pairs so that the
details won’t get misplaced by accident.

adding depth to the two vertical dividers from the devices front section

Step 10

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create
two more 2 x 10 px shapes, which we
will color using white (#FFFFFF), and then position to the left side of each
vertical divider, making sure to adjust their Blending Mode to Lighten and
lower their Opacity to 40%.

adding some subtle highlights to the vertical dividers

Step 11

Next, we’ll start working on
the off/on switch, by creating a 10 x 4
px
rectangle (#D8C5C5) which we will align to the front body’s top section,
positioning it towards the right side of the first vertical divider.

creating the base section for the onoff switch

Step 12

Using the Rounded Rectangle Tool, create
a 28 x 8 px shape (#D8C5C5) with a 4 px Corner Radius, and then add a
smaller 20 x 4 px rounded rectangle
(#EDE4E4) with a 2 px Corner Radius on
top of it.

creating the main shapes for the onoff switch

Step 13

Create two 2 x 4 px rectangles
(#EDE4E4), which we will adjust by rounding their bottom corners. Position them 2 px from one
another, placing them over the rectangle from the base of the off/on switch.

adding the two vertical lines to the onoff switch

Step 14

Fill in the little gaps surrounding the
switch’s two vertical lines, using three 2
x 2 px
squares (#C1A8A8) which will act as shadows, thus giving this
section more depth.

adding shadows to the top section of the onoff switch

Step 15

Finish off the switch by adding some details such as the shadows from underneath
the vertical lines and the button itself, using duplicates of the shapes that
we already have, making sure to adjust them by setting their color to #C1A8A8.

Once you’ve added the shadows, don’t forget to
cast a subtle highlight onto the switch’s button top half, using white (#FFFFFF) for the
color, Lighten for the Blending Mode, and 40% for the Opacity.

adding finishing touches to the onoff switch

Step 16

Move a few pixels towards the bottom, and add a 136 x 2 px white (#FFFFFF) rectangle
underneath the thicker horizontal divider, which we will turn into a highlight
by setting its Blending Mode to Lighten and lowering its Opacity to 40%.

At this point we’re pretty much done with the upper section of the device, which means we can now focus on creating the display, which is where all the fun takes place.

adding a subtle highlight underneath the devices horizontal divider

Step 17

Grab the Rounded
Rectangle Tool
and create an 88 x 120
px
shape with a 4 px Corner Radius,
which we will color using #7E7E89 and then align to the device’s front
section, positioning it just under the horizontal highlight at a distance of 4 px.

creating and positioning the devices screen

Step 18

With the display in place, we’ll have to adjust
it a bit, by setting its lower right corner radius to 20 px instead of the default 4
px
that we’ve used for the other ones.

adjusting the lower right corner of the devices screen

Step 19

Give the screen an all-around shadow by creating a copy of its main shape (Control-C > Control-F) and then
applying a -2 px offset to it, which
we will use to create a cutout with the help of Pathfinder’s Minus Front option.

Then, select the resulting shape and change its
color to black (#000000), lowering its Opacity
to 20%.

adding the all-around shadow to the devices screen

Step 20

Using a similar process, add an all-around 2 px thick inner highlight, using white for the color (#FFFFFF), Lighten for the Blending Mode, and 20% for
the Opacity.

adding the all-around highlight to the devices screen

Step 21

With the help of the Rectangle
Tool (M)
, create an 80 x 64 px shape,
which we will color using #82874D since it will act as the active area of the
display, and position it over the grey section, making sure to align it to its
center.

adding the green dot matrix screen to the device

Step 22

Give the dot matrix screen some depth by casting a 4 px thick inner shadow (color:
black; Opacity: 20%) using the Offset Path tool.

adding the inner shadow to the dot matrix screen

Step 23

Once you’ve added the shadow, grab the Pen Tool (P) and trace a couple of diagonal highlights, using white
(#FFFFFF) as your fill color, setting the Blending
Mode
to Soft Light, and making sure to lower the Opacity to 40%.

adding the diagonal highlights to the dot matrix screen

Step 24

At this point the screen is almost done. All we need to do now is add the
little decals that you would normally find on the device, and the little
battery indicator. I’m going to let you get a little creative and draw them
yourself, so take your time and add them using some basic shapes which you will color using #6B6B75.

adding the decals to the devices screen

Step 25

Finish off the screen by adding two pairs of vertical highlights (color: white; Blending Mode: Lighten; Opacity:
20%), and then select all its composing elements and group them together
using the Control-G keyboard
shortcut.

adding finishing touches to the devices screen

Step 26

Move a couple of pixels towards the bottom, and using the Ellipse Tool (L) create a 44 x 44 px circle (#DDCCCC) which we
will position about 24 px from
the screen’s bottom section.

positioning the cutout for the d-pad

Step 27

Once you’ve added the circle, it’s time to start working on the d-pad by
creating a vertical 14 x 36 px rounded
rectangle (#6B6B75) with a 2 px Corner
Radius
on top of which we will add a rotated copy of it, making sure to
center them to the underlying shape.

creating the main shapes for the d-pad button

Step 28

Give the button some depth by adding a 12 x 12 px circle (#5E5E68) which we will position in the center.

adding depth to the d-pad button

Step 29

Finish off the d-pad by adding a couple of highlights (color: white; Blending Mode: Lighten; Opacity:
20%) and shadows (color: #BAA0A0),
and then select all its composing shapes and the circle from underneath and
group them together (Control-G).

adding finishing touches to the d-pad button

Step 30

Since we’ll be
adding a couple more buttons, it would be a good idea to add the vertical
highlights now, so that we won’t have to create and send them to the back
afterwards.

So, using the Rectangle Tool (M), create
four pairs of highlights, using white (#FFFFFF) for the fill color, setting the
Blending Mode to Lighten and lowering the Opacity to 40%, and position them towards the right side of the console.

adding the main highlights to the front section of the device

Step 31

Once you’ve added the highlights, you can grab the Ellipse Tool (L) and use it to create the first of two 16 x 16 px buttons (#A86578), which we
will position 36 px from the right
side of the device and 62 px from
its bottom side.

positioning the b button onto the device

Step 32

Start adding details to the button by creating a subtle highlight (color: white; Blending Mode: Lighten; Opacity:
20%) and casting a small shadow using a copy of the shape which we will
color using #DDCCCC and then position underneath it.

Once you’ve added the finishing touches, group all the buttons elements together using the Control-G keyboard shortcut.

adding details to the b button

Step 33

Create a copy (Control-C >
Control-F
) of the button that we’ve just created, and position it towards
the right side, at a distance of 8 px,
moving it towards the top side by 12 px.

adding the a button to the device

Step 34

Grab the Pen Tool (P), and
using an 8 px thick Stroke (#7E7E89) with a Round Cap, draw a diagonal line which will act as the select button, and position it
towards the bottom side of the d-pad.

creating the main shape for the select button

Step 35

Give the button a subtle highlight (color:
white; Stroke Weight: 2 px; Cap: Round Cap) and an underlying
shadow (color: #DDCCCC; Stroke Weight: 8 px; Cap: Round Cap), group them (Control-G), and create and position a
copy towards the right side at about 4
px
.

adding the start button to the device

Step 36

Add the little speaker grille from the device’s lower right corner, by
drawing six 4 px thick Stroke lines (#AD9C9C) with a Round Cap, which you will stack next to
one another in a diagonal line.

adding the speaker grill to the device

Step 37

Once you have the speaker grille, finish off the front of the device, by
adding an 8 px thick decal (#7E7E89)
in-between the screen and the d-pad, and a copy of the off/on button towards
the bottom, where you would normally find the headphone jack.

finishing off the front section of the device

Quick tip: when
you create the headphone indicator using the copy of the off/on button, remember that you will have to slightly adjust it, since flipping it will
reverse the positioning of the shadow and highlight.

6. Add Details to the
Side Section of the Game Boy

At this point we’re pretty much done working on the front of the device,
which means that we can now focus on its side section.

Step 1

Grab a copy of the front section’s main highlight, and paste it over the
side section, making sure to align it to its left side settings its Opacity to 60%, and then group (Control-G)
and send them both to the back (right
click > Arrange > Send to Back
).

adding the main highlight to the side section of the device

Step 2

Create a copy (Control-C >
Control-F
) of the console’s front section and then apply a 4 px offset to it, from which we will
create a cutout with the help of our copy. Then, change the resulting shape’s
color to #BAA0A0, and position its left side so that it gets aligned to the
center of the visible area of our device’s side section.

adding the vertical divider line to the side section of the device

Step 3

Since we’ll want the vertical divider line to be constrained within the
surface of the side section, we will use a copy of the underlying shape to
create a Clipping Mask (right click > Make Clipping Mask) in
order to hide the areas protruding outside of it.

masking the vertical divider line from the devices side section

Quick tip: if
you’ve never used Clipping Masks before,
you should read this tutorial that explains all the advantages of using the Clipping
Mask
over Pathfinder’s Shape Modes.

Step 4

Using the Rectangle
Tool (M)
, create a 10 x 4 px shape
which we will color using #BAA0A0 and then position towards the top side, next
to the front section’s horizontal divider.

adding the horizontal divider line to the side section of the device

Step 5

Next, add a 10
x 2 px
shadow (#A58888) above the horizontal divider that we’ve just
created, and a subtle 10 x 2 px highlight
(color: white; Blending Mode: Lighten; Opacity:
60%) right underneath it.

adding the shadow and highlight to the side sections horizontal divider

Step 6

Grab the Rectangle
Tool (M)
and create a group of ten 8
x 2 px
shapes, which we will color using #A58888, and vertically distribute
at 6 px from one another, making
sure to position them towards the left side of the device’s side section, 48 px from its bottom.

positioning the main shapes for the devices side grill

Step 7

Create a copy of the group of rectangles that we’ve
just created, and push them towards the bottom by 2 px, changing their color to #BAA0A0 so that they can stand out
from the originals.

adding the secondary grill lines to the side of the device

Step 8

Finish off the side grille by adding a third
copy of the horizontal rectangles underneath the lines that we’ve just created,
which we will need to adjust by changing their Width from 8 px to just 4 px. Then, change their color to white
(#FFFFFF), and set their Blending Mode to
Lighten while making sure to lower
their Opacity to 60%.

finishing off the devices side grill

Step 9

Since the idea of doing a tutorial is to learn not only by recreating but
by trying new things out, I’m going to let you finish the side section of our
little Game Boy by adding the power input and the contrast wheel.

That being said, take your time, get them done,
and then move on to the last step.

finishing off the side section of the game boy

Step 10

If you’ve reached
this final step, that means you’ve managed to do a great job on finishing off
the side section of our little Game Boy.

Now it’s time to
finish off the tutorial by adding the final piece to the illustration, which is
that subtle shadow from underneath the device itself.

To create it, simply grab the Ellipse
Tool (L)
and draw a 148 x 16 px ellipse,
which we will color using a darker red (#DD5252) and then position underneath
our device, at a distance of 12 px from
it.

game boy illustration finished

Game Over, Baby!

It took us a while but we’ve finally done it, and boy does the result
look good! I hope that you’ve managed to keep up with each step, and most
importantly learned something new in the process.

illustration final preview

Source: Photoshop Tutorials +

Share This